Humour and Wit

Humour

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Humour noun – A message whose ingenuity or verbal skill or incongruity has the power to evoke laughter.
Wit is a synonym for humour in characteristic topic. In some cases you can use "Wit" instead a noun "Humour", when it comes to topics like character trait, language, satire, joking. popular alternative
Nearby Words: humor, humouring, humorous, humourless, humored
Synonyms for Humour

Wit

Show Definitions
Wit noun – A message whose ingenuity or verbal skill or incongruity has the power to evoke laughter.
Humour is a synonym for wit in characteristic topic. You can use "Humour" instead a noun "Wit", if it concerns topics such as character trait, language, satire, wittiness. popular alternative
Nearby Words: witty, witling
Synonyms for Wit

How words are described

good good humour good wit
pure pure humour pure wit
usual usual humour usual wit
original original humour original wit
Other adjectives: actual, dry, great, dark, caustic, satirical, subtle, silly, deadpan, observational.

Both words in one sentence

  • Series / That Mitchell and Webb Look Buffy Speak: Several shows written by the lazy writers contain examples, not done out of wit or humour, just because they couldn't be bothered finding out the right terminology.
  • Darker and Edgier: The novel, although brimming with wit and humour, turns out to be more depressing than its predecessor.
  • To many people Victorian wit and humour is summed up by Punch, when every joke is supposed to end with "Collapse of Stout Party", though this phrase tends to be as elusive as "Elementary, my dear Watson" in the Sherlock Holmes sagas.
Cite this Source
Wit and Humour. (2016). Retrieved 2019, December 05, from https://thesaurus.plus/related/humour/wit
Humour & Wit. N.p., 2016. Web. 05 Dec. 2019. <https://thesaurus.plus/related/humour/wit>.
Wit or Humour. 2016. Accessed December 05, 2019. https://thesaurus.plus/related/humour/wit.

Synonyms for humour
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Synonyms for wit
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Google Ngram Viewer shows how "humour" and "wit" have occurred on timeline: